Black boys 168 times more likely to be excluded

A poor black boy with special educational needs is 168 times more likely to be excluded from school than a richer white girl without them according to the Children’s Commissioner for England, Maggie Atikinson.

Publishing findings from its School Exclusions Inquiry in the report They Never Give Up On You, the Commissioner produced a promotional film on school exclusions which asks:

How can a system be fair when a white boy is 2.4 times more likely to be excluded than a white girl, a white boy with special educational needs is 30 times more likely to be excluded than a white girl without them, when a poor white boy with special educational needs is 60 times more likely to be excluded from school than a richer white girl without them, when a poor black boy with special educational needs is 168 times more likely to be excluded from school than a richer white girl without them ?”

According to the Commissioner, exclusions can affect boys like a life sentence that locks them out of future opportunities.

About

Glen Poole is UK co-ordinator for International Men's Day, Director at the consultancy Helping Men and news editor of insideMAN magazine. Follow him on twitter @HelpingMen or find out more about his work at www.helpingmen.co.uk.

Posted in NEWS
2 comments on “Black boys 168 times more likely to be excluded
  1. Nigel says:

    This is a very important issue. Of course the levels of achievement are important and there is rightly discussion of teaching styles and examinations. However as a social care professional I am increasingly concerned at the growth in numbers of young men in particular leaving the education system with labels (Autism,ADHD,Challenging Behaviour) which have the effect of wrecking their confidence and creating a aura of difficulty about them. Either suddenly our youngsters are exposed to strange new virus’s that means they have “caught” these disorders or more likely we are distorting our responses to similar behaviours exhibited by previous generations by labelling them disorders. The rates of exclusion are the tip of an iceberg. I don’t know the solution but I do know there needs to be be a very searching look at the way we educate in this country.

    • glenpoole says:

      Thanks Nigel,

      It is particularly worrying when you look at the outcomes for excluded children in areas – too stats that to leap to mind – 90% of young offenders were excluded from school – kids excluded from school are 19 times more likely to commit suicide

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